Radiology

Thoracic Radiograph

A thoracic (chest) radiograph (X-ray) is a procedure that allows your veterinarian to visualize tissues, organs and bones that lie beneath the skin of the chest cavity. Thoracic radiographs are recommended for any pet with difficulty breathing or with suspicion of heart disease or lung disease. They are also indicated in geriatric patients, and in patients that may have cancer, to evaluate for metastasis (spread). X-rays of the chest should be taken of every animal that has been hit by a car or suffered other types of major trauma because they can reveal many types of injuries to the chest wall, lungs and heart, or other injuries like diaphragmatic hernia. X-rays are also often repeated to monitor progress after treatment or after removing fluid for better visualization of structures. There is no real contraindication to performing this test. Even normal results help determine health or exclude certain diseases.
 Thoracic Radiograph

Abdominal Radiograph

An abdominal radiograph (X-ray) is a procedure that allows your veterinarian to visualize tissue, organs and bones that lie beneath the skin. Abdominal X-rays are indicated to evaluate pets with abdominal symptoms such as vomiting, retching, constipation or diarrhea. This test can also be helpful in cases of unexplained fever, abdominal trauma, penetrating abdominal wounds, loss of appetite or weight loss
An X-ray is often done when a pet is suspected of swallowing foreign material, when blood tests indicate a problem with abdominal organs, or as a follow up to physical examination when abdominal pain or another abnormality is detected. Detecting stage of pregnancy and number of fetuses is another important use of the X-ray. Kidney, urinary bladder and reproductive tract problems can also benefit from an abdominal X-ray. There is no real contraindication to performing this test.
Abdominal RadiographNotice the urinary bladder stone – White circular opacity under the hips in the back of the abdomen.